Hall of Fame Index

1956 Men’s Basketball Team

Led by Bill Russell and K.C. Jones, the 1956 U.S. Men’s Basketball Team was dominant at the Melbourne 1956 Olympic Games, winning each of its eight games by at least 30 points en route to winning a gold medal.

Read More »

1960 Men’s Basketball Team

Perhaps the greatest amateur basketball team ever assembled, the roster included 10 future NBA players, including the next four players to win Rookie of the Year. The team won its games by an average of 42.4 points en route to the gold medal.

Read More »

1980 Men’s Ice Hockey Team

The 1980 U.S. Men’s Ice Hockey Team of college players and minor leaguers pulled perhaps the biggest upset ever in Olympic Games history, pulling off the “Miracle On Ice” to win the gold medal at the Lake Placid 1980 Winter Olympic Games.

Read More »

1992 Men’s Basketball Team

The best basketball team ever assembled, the 1992 U.S. Men’s Basketball Team had 11 future Hall of Famers and won all of its games by at least 30 points in the Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games.

Read More »

1996 Women’s Soccer Team

Women’s soccer was added to the Olympic Games for the first time ever and while it was only an eight-team competition, it was a rousing success capped by the U.S. 2-1 victory over China in the gold medal game.

Read More »

1998 Women’s Ice Hockey Team

The U.S. Women’s Ice Hockey Team’s gold medal at the Nagano 1998 Winter Olympic Games had a lasting impact; there were 28,000 girls and women who played ice hockey at the time, a number that has grown to 80,000 today.

Read More »

Abie Grossfeld

Abie Grossfeld was a two-time Olympian, but his biggest impact was as a coach, including guiding the 1984 U.S. men’s gymnastics team to the team all-around title.

Read More »

Al Oerter

Al Oerter overcame any obstacle in his path to win four consecutive Olympic gold medals in the discus, setting an Olympic record every time.

Read More »

Alice Coachman

Alice Coachman first won a national title in 1939; in 1940 and 1944 The Olympics were canceled because of World War II. Coachman finally won gold in the high jump at the London 1948 London Games.

Read More »

Alvin Kraenzlein

At the Paris 1900 Olympic Games, Alvin Kraenzlein’s technique helped him become the first to win four gold medals in individual events at a single Olympics.

Read More »

Amy Van Dyken

Swimmer Amy Van Dyken overcame asthma to win six Olympic gold medals. In the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games, she became the first American woman to win four gold medals in a single Olympics.

Read More »

Apolo Anton Ohno

Short-track speedskater Apolo Anton Ohno is the most decorated winter Olympian in U.S. history, winning eight medals over three Olympic Games.

Read More »

Babe Didrikson

Babe Didrikson might have won more medals at the Los Angeles 1932 Olympic Games, but at the time women were only permitted to enter three individual events.

Read More »

Bart Conner

The most accomplished American male gymnast, Bart Conner starred at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games as he led the U.S. to the team all-around gold medal and won a gold on the parallel bars.

Read More »

Bill Toomey

Despite a childhood injury that limited functionality in his right (throwing) hand, Bill Toomey set an Olympic record as he won a gold medal in the decathlon at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Billy Mills

A Native American from tiny Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Billy Mills surged down the stretch to win the 10,000-meter run at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history.

Read More »

Bob Beamon

Bob Beamon broke the previous world record in the long jump by nearly two feet as he soared 29 feet 2 1/2 inches to win a gold medal at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Bob Hayes

NFL Hall of Famer “Bullet” Bob Hayes won two gold medals at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games. and is the only person ever to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring.

Read More »

Bob Mathias

A superb athlete, Bob Mathias did not know what a decathlon was until his high school coach suggested trying it. A few months later, Mathias won the first of his two Olympic gold medals.

Read More »

Bob Richards

Bob Richards became the first man to win multiple Olympic gold medals in the pole vault. He was the first athlete pictured on the front of a Wheaties cereal box.

Read More »

Bonnie Blair

Speedskater Bonnie Blair was well known for her throng of family and friends and she gave them plenty to cheer about, winning four gold medals and two bronze over four Olympic Games.

Read More »

Brian Boitano

Figure skater Brian Boitano put on the performance of his life at the Calgary 1988 Winter Olympic Games, defeating rival Brian Orser of Canada to win the gold medal.

Read More »

Bruce Baumgartner

Bruce Baumgartner captured medals — including two gold medals — in four consecutive Olympic Games, becoming just the fourth American to do so.

Read More »

Bruce Jenner

A football injury derailed Bruce Jenner’s football career and started a path to a gold medal in the decathlon at the Montreal 1976 Olympic Games. Jenner later came out as transgender and changed her name to Caitlyn Jenner.

Read More »

Candace Cable

Candace Cable participated in nine different Paralympic Games in three sports and was the first U.S. woman to win medals in both the Summer and Winter Paralympic Games. She won eight gold medals and had 84 career first-place marathon finishes.

Read More »

Carl Lewis

One of the world’s greatest athletes ever, Carl Lewis won nine Olympic gold medals, including four consecutive gold medals in the long jump.

Read More »

Carlo Fassi

After the U.S. figure skating delegation was wiped out by a plane crash en route to the 1961 World Championships, Italian Coach Carlo Fassi was brought to the United States to rebuild the program.

Read More »

Carol Heiss

Carol Heiss won a silver medal at the Cortina d’Ampezzo 1956 Winter Olympic Games, then won four consecutive U.S. and World championships and gold at the Squaw Valley 1960 Winter Olympic Games.

Read More »

Charles Daniels

Charles Daniels is generally credited with modernized the forward crawl to the freestyle stroke; he won four Olympic gold medals at the St Louis 1904 Olympic Games and London 1908 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Charley Paddock

After serving in the U.S. Army in World War I, Charley Paddock participated in three Olympic Games, winning two gold medals and two silver. He died in a plane crash while serving in World War II.

Read More »

Chris Waddell

Paralyzed from the waist down after a skiing accident, Chris Waddell went on to compete in seven Paralympic Games, winning 13 medals and becoming the most decorated male monoskier in U.S. history.

Read More »

Connie Carpenter-Phinney

After an ankle injury ended her speedskating career, Connie Carpenter-Phinney took up cycling and won a gold medal in the Olympic women’s cycling debut event at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dan Gable

Perhaps the greatest wrestler ever, Dan Gable went undefeated as a high schooler, lost just one match in college and did not allow a point in winning a gold medal at the Munich 1972 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dan Jansen

After failing to win a medal in his first three Olympics, speed skater Dan Jansen set a world record and won gold in his final Olympic race, the 1,000 meters in the Lillehammer 1994 Winter Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dan O’Brien

Having failed to qualify for the previous two Olympic Games, Dan O’Brien took full advantage of his opportunity by winning the gold medal in the decathlon at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dara Torres

Dara Torres was nicknamed “Mom” by U.S. Olympic teammates at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games where at age 41 she set three American records in winning three silver medals.

Read More »

David Robinson

David Robinson did not stand out on the basketball court until starring at the Naval Academy. He played in three Olympic Games, winning two gold medals and one bronze.

Read More »

Debbie Meyer

16-year-old Debbie Meyer overcame asthma and set Olympic records in the 200-, 400- and 800-meter freestyle as she won three gold medals at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Diana Golden

Despite losing much of her right leg to cancer at age 12, Diana Golden was simply an athlete, winning two Paralympic gold medals and 10 world championships.

Read More »

Dick Button

Dick Button added extra difficulty to his performances as he claimed back-to-back gold medals at the St. Moritz 1948 Winter Olympic Games and Oslo 1952 Winter Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dick Fosbury

Dick Fosbury revolutionized the high jump. After Fosbury set an Olympic record and won gold at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games, the “Fosbury Flop” became a staple of every high jumper.

Read More »

Don Schollander

Swimmer Don Schollander won four gold medals at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, the most by an American in a single Olympics in 28 years. He won three more in the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Donna de Varona

Donna de Varona made her Olympic debut as a 13-year-old at the Rome 1960 Olympic Games, winning a relay gold medal, and won two more gold medals at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games.

Read More »

Dorothy Hamill

Dorothy Hamill inspired a generation of girls. With her bob haircut and peaceful nature, Hamill was brilliant, skating to the ladies’ singles gold medal at the Innsbruck 1976 Winter Olympic Games.

Read More »

Duke Kahanamoku

Duke Kahanamoku introduced a powerful style of swimming, winning five medals (three gold) over three Olympic Games. He then became a surfing ambassador to the world, popularizing that sport.

Read More »

Ed Temple

Ed Temple built Tennessee State University women’s track and field into a powerhouse. Forty of his athletes competed in the Olympics. He coached the 1960 and 1964 U.S. Olympic Women’s Track Teams.

Read More »

Eddie Eagan

12 years after winning a boxing gold medal, bobsledding rookie Eddie Eagan added another gold medal in his first and only bobsled race.

Read More »

Eric Heiden

Eric Heiden won an unprecedented gold medals in all five distances at the Lake Placid 1980 Winter Olympic Games, from the 500-meter sprint to the grueling 10,000-meter race.

Read More »

Erin Popovich

Swimmer Erin Popovich is a three-time Paralympian; 14 of her 19 Paralympic medals were golds. She is a two-time winner of the ESPY Award for Best Female Athlete with a Disability.

Read More »

Evelyn Ashford

Evelyn Ashford won four gold medals and one silver medal while competing in four Olympic Games and at age 35 became the oldest woman to win gold in track and field.

Read More »

Florence Griffith Joyner

Florence Griffith Joyner was one of the most flamboyant runners of all time. Known for her long hair, long fingernails and bright track suits, FloJo won three Olympic gold medals and two silvers.

Read More »

Floyd Patterson

It was during his time at reform school that Floyd Patterson became interested in boxing. At 17 years old, he won an Olympic gold medal and went on to a prolific professional career.

Read More »

Frank Shorter

At the Munich 1972 Olympic Games, Frank Shorter became the first American man in 64 years to win an Olympic marathon gold medal. He added a silver at the Montreal 1976 Olympic Games.

Read More »
Skip to content