Hall of Fame Index

Frank Wykoff

Frank Wykoff won gold medals in the 4×100-meter relay at three consecutive Olympic Games, the first athlete to accomplish that feat.

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Gail Devers

Diagnosed with Graves’ disease, sprinter Gail Devers nearly needed her feet amputated. But she recovered to win three gold medals and competed in five Olympic Games.

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Gary Hall Jr.

Gary Hall Jr. was known for his showman-like nature and his fast speeds in the pool. Often arriving in a patriotic robe and boxing shorts, Hall won 10 Olympic medals, five gold, over three Olympic Games.

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George Foreman

A high school dropout, George Foreman entered the Job Corps program, a decision that led him to a successful boxing career and a gold medal at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

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Glenn Davis

Glenn “Jeep” Davis had blazing speed that carried him to three Olympic gold medals. Following his track career, he played two years of professional football in the NFL before becoming a track coach.

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Greg Louganis

Greg Louganis became the first male diver to sweep the 3-meter springboard and 10-meter platform events in consecutive Olympics Games.

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Harrison Dillard

Harrison “Bones” Dillard is the only man to win Olympic gold medals in the 100-meter dash and the 110-meter hurdles. In between the 1948 and 1952 Olympic Games, he served in the U.S. Army.

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Helene Madison

“Queen” Helene Madison was one of the first American female swimming stars, winning two individual gold medals and the 4×100-meter freestyle relay gold at the Los Angeles 1932 Olympic Games.

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Herb Brooks

The last player cut from the 1960 U.S. Olympic Team that won gold at Squaw Valley, Herb Brooks played in the next two Olympics and was the coach of the 1980 Miracle On Ice gold-medal winning team.

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J. Michael Plumb

Equestrian J. Michael Plumb competed in seven Olympics, more than any other American athlete, winning six medals: two gold and four silver.

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Jack Kelly Sr.

Snubbed by the elite Diamond Sculls, Jack Kelly Sr. entered the Antwerp 1920 Olympic Games just to gain a measure of revenge. He did just that, claiming gold medals in the single and double scull.

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Jack Shea

Speed skater Jack Shea in 1932 became the first American to win multiple gold medals in a single Olympic Winter Games. He was killed by a drunk driver weeks before his grandson won Olympic gold.

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Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Jackie Joyner-Kersee won six Olympic medals (three gold), started four years on the UCLA women’s basketball team and was named the Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th Century by Sports Illustrated.

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James Connolly

James Connolly dropped out of Harvard to participate in the first-ever modern Olympics, the Athens 1896 Olympic Games, where he placed first in the very first event, the triple jump.

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Janet Evans

Janet Evans competed in three Olympics and won four gold medals. She will never forget passing the torch to Muhammad Ali to light the Olympic Flame at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games.

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Jean Driscoll

Jean Driscoll got into wheelchair racing in college and became a five-time Paralympic gold medalist. She won two gold medals in the marathon and also won seven consecutive Boston Marathons.

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Jenny Thompson

Swimmer Jenny Thompson is the most decorated American female in Olympic history, winning 12 medals over the course of four Olympic Games: eight gold, three silver and one bronze.

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Jim Thorpe

The first Native American to win an Olympic gold medal for the U.S., Jim Thorpe won the pentathlon and decathlon at the Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games. He later played pro baseball and football.

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Joan Benoit

Joan Benoit had knee surgery 17 days before the 1984 U.S. Olympic Trials, but finished first at the Trials and won gold in the first-ever Olympic women’s marathon at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.

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Joe Frazier

Joe Frazier traveled to the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games as an alternate and took advantage when an injury gave him a spot in the heavyweight tournament, winning a gold medal.

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John Carlos

John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s protest for racial equality has echoed throughout the sports world since the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

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John Davis

One of the most dominant athletes of his generation, John Davis compiled a 15-year winning streak that included gold medals at the London 1948 Olympic Games and the Helsinki 1952 Olympic Games.

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John Morgan

A competitive swimmer, John Morgan lost his eyesight as a teenager after an accident while working out. He eventually got back in the pool and won 15 Paralympic medals, 13 of them gold.

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John Naber

At the Montreal 1976 Olympic Games, John Naber won four gold medals: 100- and 200-meter backstroke, 4×100-meter medley relay, 4×200-meter freestyle relay — all in world-record time.

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Johnny Weissmuller

Johnny Weissmuller took up swimming in an attempt to build stamina after contracting polio as a youngster. He won five Olympic gold medals before finding Hollywood stardom.

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Karch Kiraly

Karch Kiraly led the U.S. to two men’s volleyball gold medals, won a gold medal in beach volleyball and coached the U.S. Women’s Volleyball Team to a bronze medal at the Rio je Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games.

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Kristi Yamaguchi

Kristi Yamaguchi won the ladies’ singles figure skating gold medal at the Albertville 1992 Olympic Winter Games, becoming the first Asian-American woman to win an Olympic gold medal.

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Kristine Lilly

Kristine Lilly played 354 games in a U.S. uniform and won two Olympic gold medals and one silver. Lilly scored goals in three consecutive games at the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.

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Lee Calhoun

Lee Calhoun was the first male athlete to win consecutive Olympics gold medals in the 110-meter hurdles, winning photo finishes at the Melbourne 1956 Olympic Games and Rome 1960 Olympic Games.

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Lee Evans

A founding member of the Olympic Project for Human Rights, Lee Evans won gold medals in the 400-meter run and the 4×400-meter relay at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.

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Lisa Fernandez

One of the greatest female athletes of all time, Lisa Fernandez won a dominant pitcher and hitter, leading the United States to three consecutive Olympic gold medals in softball.

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Lisa Leslie

A four-time Olympic gold medalist, Lisa Leslie owns 10 U.S. Olympic records, including most points in a game (35). Leslie was a three-time WNBA Most Valuable Player and two-time WNBA champion.

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Lones Wigger Jr.

Labeled the “greatest shooter in history,” Lones Wigger Jr. won two gold medals and one silver over the course of three Olympic Games before becoming a director at the U.S. Olympic Training Center.

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Mal Whitfield

Mal Whitfield won gold in the 800-meter run and the 4x-400-meter relay at the London 1948 Olympic Games, becoming the first American active-duty service member to win an Olympic gold medal.

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Mark Spitz

After falling short of his goals at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games, Mark Spitz won seven gold medals in eight days at the Munich 1972 Olympic Games, setting a world record in each event he entered.

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Mary Lou Retton

Mary Lou Retton scored perfect 10s on the floor exercise and vault to win the individual all-around gold medal at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.

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Mary T. Meagher

Mary T. Meagher set her first world record before she began high school and Madame Butterfly, as she was known, won three gold medals at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.

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Matt Biondi

Matt Biondi was a late bloomer before finding his stride and leaving his mark as one of the most accomplished swimmers of all time, with eight Olympic gold medals, two silvers and one bronze.

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Mel Sheppard

Unable to get a job as a New York City policeman, Mel Sheppard focused on training for The Olympics and won four gold medals and one silver as a middle-distance runner.

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Michael Johnson

Michael Johnson was one of the world’s best sprinters of his time, capturing four Olympic gold medals over three Olympic Games and maintaining his speed even as he aged.

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Micki King

Micki King hit her arm on the board on her ninth dive of the 3-meter springboard at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games and finished fourth. She won gold at the Munich 1972 Olympic Games.

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Milt Campbell

Milt Campbell’s first-ever decathlon was at the 1952 U.S. Olympic Trials. He went on to win silver at the Helsinki 1952 Olympic Games. Campbell won gold at the Melbourne 1956 Olympic Games.

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Misty May-Treanor

Misty May-Treanor was a college star at indoor volleyball, then successfully transitioned to one of the best beach volleyball careers of all-time, teaming with Kerri Walsh Jennings to win three Olympic gold medals and retiring with a then-record 112 wins.

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Muhammad Ali

He won a gold medal at the Rome 1960 Olympic Games while known as Muhammad Ali, but perhaps his most iconic moment came when lighting the Olympic Flame at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games.

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Nastia Liukin

Daughter of two acclaimed gymnasts forged her own career, winning the women’s individual all-around gold medal at the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, where her five medals equaled the most ever in a single Olympics by an American female gymnast.

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Oscar De La Hoya

Oscar De La Hoya first donned boxing gloves at age 4. A decorated amateur, “The Golden Boy” won gold at the Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games and shined as a pro before becoming a boxing promoter.

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Parry O’Brien

After quitting his college football team, Parry O’Brien became the most dominant shotputter of his time, winning 116 consecutive meets, including two Olympic gold medals.

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Pat McCormick

Pat McCormick swept the 3-meter springboard and 10-meter platform diving events at the Helsinki 1952 Olympic Games and Melbourne 1956 Olympic Games, the first to accomplish that feat twice.

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Peggy Fleming

Peggy Fleming made her Olympic debut at the Innsbruck 1964 Olympic Winter Games and won gold at the Grenoble 1968 Olympic Winter Games. She is credited with reviving American figure skating.

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Peter Vidmar

Peter Vidmar led the U.S. to the team all-around gold medal and scored a perfect 10 to win gold on the pommel horse in the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games; he won silver in the individual all-around.

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Phil Mahre

Phil Mahre navigated the slalom course at the Sarajevo 1984 Olympic Winter Games to become just the second American to ever win a gold medal in Alpine Skiing.

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Picabo Street

Picabo Street won a silver medal in the downhill at the Lillehammer 1994 Olympic Winter Games and recovered from a knee injury to win gold in the Super-G at the Nagano 1998 Olympic Winter Games.

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Rafer Johnson

Rafer Johnson started on the UCLA basketball team and was drafted by the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams. He took silver in the decathlon at the 1956 Melbourne Games and won gold at the 1960 Rome Games.

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Ralph Boston

Relatively unknown until a tuneup meet prior to the Rome 1960 Olympic Games, long jumper Ralph Boston broke Jesse Owens’ long-standing world record and went on to win Olympic gold.

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Randy Snow

After losing use of his legs in a farming accident, Randy Snow once again became an elite athlete, winning two Paralympic gold medals and one bronze.

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Ray Ewry

Ray Ewry was orphaned and contracted polio as a youngster, but worked hard to develop into a world-class athlete and won eight gold medals over three Olympic Games.

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Ron O’Brien

After narrowly missing qualifying for the Rome 1960 Olympic Games, Ron O’Brien became one of the sport’s finest coaches. His divers won 154 gold, 90 silver and 78 bronze medals in major Olympic, world, national, NCAA and Big Ten Conference diving championships in his first 25 years of coaching.

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Rowdy Gaines

“Swimming’s Greatest Ambassador,” Rowdy Gaines tried lots of other sports before falling in love with swimming and winning three gold medals at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games.

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Sammy Lee

Diver Sammy Lee overcame racial prejudice while growing up to become the first Asian-American man to win an Olympic gold medal.

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