STORYCORPS SHORT PIECES

Kara and Russ Winger pose for a photo at the Broadmoor
U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum photo
Kara and Russ Winger are fierce competitors and benefit by sharing their experiences training, traveling and competing with one another.

A quick conversation: Kara and Russ Winger

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Kara Winger’s family moved a lot growing up. She lived in seven different houses before fifth grade, which she remembers as the time when children have established strong relationships from their friends as they head to middle school.

“I found most of my identity in sports,” she said. “I kept playing sports because that’s what my constant was throughout my growing up years. Because I developed that habit, it was just easy to keep as the focus of my life rather than being vulnerable to friendships in other places.”

Listen: “I love being friends with those girls, my competitors.”

A three-time Olympian in javelin, Winger continues to train for Tokyo 2021. Part of her support team is her husband Russ, an international competitor in the discus and shotput.




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