Olympiad: 1964 Tokyo Summer Games

One of the greatest basketball coaches of all-time, Hank Iba guided the United States men's basketball teams to two Olympic gold medals and one silver.
Ed Temple built Tennessee State University women's track and field into a powerhouse. Forty of his athletes competed in the Olympics. He coached the 1960 and 1964 U.S. Olympic Women's Track Teams.
Labeled the "greatest shooter in history," Lones Wigger Jr. won two gold medals and one silver over the course of three Olympic Games before becoming a director at the U.S. Olympic Training Center.
The first American woman to compete in five Olympic Games, Willye White won silver in long jump at the Melbourne 1956 Olympic Games and the 4x100-meter relay at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games.
Wyomia Tyus won the 100-meter dash gold medal at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games. Four years later in Mexico City, she became the first person to repeat as Olympic gold medalist in the 100.
Swimmer Don Schollander won four gold medals at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, the most by an American in a single Olympics in 28 years. He won three more in the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.
Equestrian J. Michael Plumb competed in seven Olympics, more than any other American athlete, winning six medals: two gold and four silver.
Al Oerter overcame any obstacle in his path to win four consecutive Olympic gold medals in the discus, setting an Olympic record every time.
After quitting his college football team, Parry O'Brien became the most dominant shotputter of his time, winning 116 consecutive meets, including two Olympic gold medals.
A Native American from tiny Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Billy Mills surged down the stretch to win the 10,000-meter run at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, one of the biggest upsets in Olympic history.
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