Hall of Fame Class: 1983

The 1980 U.S. Men's Ice Hockey Team of college players and minor leaguers pulled perhaps the biggest upset ever in Olympic history, pulling off the "Miracle On Ice" to win the gold medal at the Lake Placid 1980 Olympic Winter Games.
After an athletic career that included participating in the decathlon and pentathlon at the Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games, Avery Brundage started a business career. He later served as president of the American Olympic Association and then was president of the International Olympic Committee from 1952 to 1972.
Johnny Weissmuller took up swimming in an attempt to build stamina after contracting polio as a youngster. He won five Olympic gold medals before finding Hollywood stardom.
The first Native American to win an Olympic gold medal for the U.S., Jim Thorpe won the pentathlon and decathlon at the Stockholm 1912 Olympic Games. He later played pro baseball and football.
After falling short of his goals at the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games, Mark Spitz won seven gold medals in eight days at the Munich 1972 Olympic Games, setting a world record in each event he entered.
Swimmer Don Schollander won four gold medals at the Tokyo 1964 Olympic Games, the most by an American in a single Olympics in 28 years. He won three more in the Mexico City 1968 Olympic Games.
Despite being told she would never walk again, Wilma Rudolph won three track and field gold medals at the Rome 1960 Olympic Games.
Bob Richards became the first man to win multiple Olympic gold medals in the pole vault. He was the first athlete pictured on the front of a Wheaties cereal box.
Al Oerter overcame any obstacle in his path to win four consecutive Olympic gold medals in the discus, setting an Olympic record every time.
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