Hall of Fame Class: 2008

Led by Kerri Strug and Shannon Miller, the Magnificent Seven became the first U.S. Women's Gymnastics Team to win the team all-around gold medal in the Olympic Games.
A former member of the UCLA men's soccer team, movie producer and director Frank Marshall was a vice president of the U.S. Olympic Committee and served on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee. He was presented the Olympic Shield in 2005 for his contributions to the Olympic and Paralympic movements.
After the U.S. figure skating delegation was wiped out by a plane crash en route to the 1961 World Championships, Italian Coach Carlo Fassi was brought to the United States to rebuild the program.
Labeled the "greatest shooter in history," Lones Wigger Jr. won two gold medals and one silver over the course of three Olympic Games before becoming a director at the U.S. Olympic Training Center.
Swimmer Amy Van Dyken overcame asthma to win six Olympic gold medals. In the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games, she became the first American woman to win four gold medals in a single Olympics.
David Robinson did not stand out on the basketball court until starring at the Naval Academy. He played in three Olympic Games, winning two gold medals and one bronze.
Equestrian J. Michael Plumb competed in seven Olympics, more than any other American athlete, winning six medals: two gold and four silver.
A competitive swimmer, John Morgan lost his eyesight as a teenager after an accident while working out. He eventually got back in the pool and won 15 Paralympic medals, 13 of them gold.
Karch Kiraly led the U.S. to two men's volleyball gold medals, won a gold medal in beach volleyball and coached the U.S. Women's Volleyball Team to a bronze medal at the Rio je Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games.
Carol Heiss won a silver medal at the Cortina d'Ampezzo 1956 Olympic Winter Games, then won four consecutive U.S. and World championships and gold at the Squaw Valley 1960 Olympic Winter Games.
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